Worship Leader Envy: The Tall Poppy Syndrome

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tall poppyTall Poppy is a pejorative term used in Australia and the U.K. to describe the resentment, jealousy or envy for those whose accomplishments seem to elevate them above their peers. Tall Poppy Syndrome is the social phenomenon that occurs when others try to achieve parity not by being satisfied with or improving themselves, but instead by trying to bring the other guy down to their own level. So the tall poppy must be criticized, attacked and cut down to size.

The potential for worship leading envy is high since we don’t have to look very far to find another leader who is younger, plays guitar better, gets more recognition, has an edgier band, has a larger choir, gets called to a bigger church, sings with more passion, has a healthier relationship with his/her pastor, writes better songs or has a better platform presence.

Sometimes instead of trying to improve our own worship leading skills or being willing to champion the worship leading successes of our colleagues, the Tall Poppy Syndrome causes us to assume and even publicly claim that the success of others must only have been possible through stylistic superficiality, musical adulteration or theological compromise.

Worship Leader envy is irrational and covetous discontent as the result of another’s perceived superior qualities, advantages, achievements and successes. Arthur Chapman wrote, “Envy is like a fly that passes all the body’s sounder parts, and dwells upon the sores.”

Envy is like looking to the left or right while running on a treadmill…your feet follow your eyes and usually cause a fall. Contentment, on the other hand, runs the race by fixing its eyes on Jesus.

“Envy is the art of counting the other fellow’s blessings instead of your own.” Harold Coffin

 

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