Two Worship Killers: Nostalgia and Novelty

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nostalgiaPlanning worship just to perpetuate past feelings or promote future ones are both worship killers.

 

Nostalgia is sentimental remembrance of previous times or significant events that continue to stir happy or meaningful personal recollections. Nostalgia in reasonable doses can provide a sense of comfort. But too much can have a negative effect perpetuating the belief that an earlier time is preferable to present day conditions.

Excessive nostalgia as it relates to worship can cause a congregation to romanticize, idealize and even embellish past worship practices in an effort to coerce present generations to perpetuate that past for future generations.

Nostalgically extending previous practices has the potential to limit a congregation to its past performance, potentially killing present and future worship efforts. The end result is worship that attempts to re-create divine moments, events or even seasons based almost completely on the idealized emotions that were originally stirred.

Novelty is the quality of being new, original or unusual just to be new, original or unusual. A novelty entertains for a short period of time until another novelty surfaces. College freshmen enjoy the novelty of independence until they have to do their own laundry. A child’s birthday present is novel until he opens the next one.

Novelty as it relates to worship can cause a congregation to over innovate, over stimulate and over imitate. Each Sunday then becomes an exercise in surpassing the creativity of the previous Sunday. So when excessive worship novelty occurs our focus is often on the creative instead of the creator.

It looks as if those who lead worship believe people can be lured by incessant brightenings, lightenings, lengthenings, abridgements, simplifications and complications. Novelties such as these are often inserted for their entertainment value. But worship is not about entertainment. The charge to Peter was feed my sheep; not try experiments on my rats, or even, teach my performing dogs new tricks.[1]

 

[1] Adapted from C.S. Lewis, Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer (San Diego: Harvest, 1964) 4-5.

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