Aug 7 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Jul 31 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Jul 10 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Jan 21 2019

Not Our Kind of People

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intercultural

Some of us can imagine our worship services filled with people of multiple colors, nationalities, economic levels and political beliefs all worshiping God together. The problem with that scenario is that most of us imagine how great that vision would be as long as those various cultures, tribes and tongues are willing to make adjustments to worship like we do.

Not in my style may really and truly mean not my kind of people, except when it comes time for the yearly youth group trip to Mexico. We are willing to go outside the church to diversify but failing miserably to do so within.[1] So why are we so ready to defer when we travel around the world but not across town or even across the aisle?

In chapter 7 of Revelation, the multitude of God’s people are standing before the throne of God sheltered by His presence. John’s vision of every tribe and tongue worshiping together as one is a heavenly prophecy of intercultural worship.

So if we aren’t meant to segregate as we worship in Heaven, then why are we so divided as we worship here on earth? Martin Luther King, Jr. famously said, “11:00 a.m. on Sunday morning is the most segregated hour in this nation.” Not much has changed since his original statement 50 years ago so maybe it’s time to try something beyond just adding a few ethnically diverse songs.

 

  1.  We must stop trying to fix it with music.

We believe music is a universal language just as long as everyone else lives in our universe. It’s impossible for intercultural worship to begin with a common musical style, so it must instead begin with a common biblical content. And when it does, music won’t get the blame for what only theology can fix.

  1.  We must become ethnodoxologists.

Ethnodoxologists encourage unity in the heart languages of those who are here and those who are not here…yet. Ethnodoxology looks beyond Americanism as having a corner on worship understanding and considers the vast work God is doing around the globe and across town.

  1.  We must be mutually inconvenienced.

Mitch Albom wrote, “Sometimes when you sacrifice something precious, you’re not really losing it. You’re just passing it on to someone else.” Our worship success will not be judged solely on how well we did it ourselves but also what conveniences we were willing to sacrifice as our spiritual act of worship so other tribes and tongues could do it too.

  1.  We must stop living monocultural lives.

Monoculture originated as an agricultural term that means the cultivation and growth of a single crop at a time. How can we expect to have intercultural worship on Sunday when we segregate monoculturally in everything else during the week?

  1.  We must have intercultural platforms.

Inserting the occasional international song is disingenuous when the people who lead those songs are homogenous. Harold Best wrote, “It is a spiritually connected culture that takes cultural differences, works through the tensions that they may create and comes to the blessed condition of mixing and reconciling them and of stewarding their increase and growth.”[2]

  1.  We must become uncomfortable with injustice.

Politicizing justice is the fear of losing control of something that was not ours to begin with, including the cultural preferences of our church. It is theologically incongruent to embrace cultural worship differences internationally while ignoring them domestically. American exceptionalism may be welcomed politically but it can’t be justified biblically. So worship that doesn’t act justly, love mercy and walk humbly by considering the voices of the marginalized is a worship God rejects.

 

 

[1] Harold Best, Unceasing Worship: Biblical Perspectives on Worship and the Arts (Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2003), 181.

[2] Ibid.

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Jan 2 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Dec 19 2018

Worship Word Wednesday

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Dec 12 2018

Worship Word Wednesday

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Feb 1 2010

Can Culturally Relevant Worship Cross the Line to Compromise?

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Paul writes to the Corinthian Church, “I make myself a slave to everyone, to win as many as possible.  To the Jews, I became like a Jew, to win the Jews” (I Cor 9:20 NIV).  “To the weak I became the weak, to win the weak.  I have become all things to all men so that by all possible means I might save some” (I Cor 9:22 NIV).  What is Paul advocating when he states, “become all things” and “by all possible means?”  Most would agree that Paul is not suggesting biblical, doctrinal, or moral compromise.  Instead, he proposes cultural accommodations for the purpose of spiritually impacting that culture.

As we apply this principle of cultural relevance to our worship, is there a line of compromise that must not be crossed?  We have already established that compromising biblically, doctrinally, and morally crosses that line.  But have churches minimized worship by adopting the cultural practices of a people who do not know what they are looking for in an effort to reach a people who do not know what they are looking for?  Is it possible for worship to radically affect culture instead of culture always affecting worship?  Has the desire for culturally relevant worship pushed us across the line by relegating worship to the place of complete synonymy with evangelism?  If there is a line…is it static or fluid according to the context of each congregation?

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