Reasons A Worship Leader Shouldn’t Take A Vacation

TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle+Share

vacation

Reasons A Worship Leader Shouldn’t Take A Vacation
  • Worship might actually occur without you.
  • Your substitute leader might do too good of a job.
  • The last word won’t be yours.
  • You’ll have to encourage and empower others to lead.
  • Church members won’t see your car parked at the church at all hours.
  • No one else can hold the musicians and tech team accountable.
  • Your identity will be shaped by your family instead of your work.
  • You might actually get some rest and renewal for a new season of ministry.
  • You won’t have an excuse for not reading and learning something new.
  • People at your vacation destination probably won’t recognize or revere you.

Most worship leaders just ended another year of busyness that culminated in a flurry of seasonal rehearsals, presentations and extra services. And since worship ministry often sanctifies busyness rather than freeing us from it, the end of one hectic season probably led immediately to another. So some of us are probably wondering if we have enough left in the tank to do it all again in 2018.

But Jesus said, “Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me – watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly” (Matt 11:28-30, The Message).

So instead of planning to work your days off and shorten your vacations, maybe it’s time to schedule and guard those 2018 away days now. Your church will survive and thrive if you take that time off, but you and your family might not if you don’t.

Scheduling margins of recovery won’t endanger your worship ministry it will extend it.

TwitterFacebookLinkedInGoogle+Share

Leave a Reply