No Wonder

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We’ve grown comfortable with superficial worship that’s explainable, rational and scheduled. A.W. Tozer wrote, “We cover our deep ignorance with words, but we are ashamed to wonder, we are afraid to whisper ‘mystery.”’[1]

Our worship will always be shallow if God’s revelation no longer amazes us. It should cause us to be fascinated, surprised, curious and captivated. But, in reality, it rarely awes or fills us with wonder.

When we are no longer amazed we are left with dry and dead religion; when we remove mystery we are left with frozen or petrified dogma; when we script awe we are left with an impotent deity; and when we abandon astonishment we are left with shallow worship.[2]

So how much deeper could our earthly worship go if we responded as if experiencing God for the first or last time? When we aren’t looking His holiness might just break through like a rainbow.[3] God is transcendent. He is beyond, above, other than and distinct from all.

So as the heavens are higher than the earth, so are His ways higher than our ways and His thoughts higher than our thoughts.[4] If that understanding alone doesn’t cause us to worship with wide-eyed wonder, then no songs or sermons ever will.

Changed from glory into glory,
till in heav’n we take our place,
till we cast our crowns before Thee,
lost in wonder, love and praise.

Charles Wesley

 

[1] A.W. Tozer, The Knowledge of the Holy (New York: Harper Collins, 1961), 18.

[2] Adapted from Michael Yaconelli, Dangerous Wonder: The Adventure of Childlike Faith (Colorado Springs: NavPress, 1998), 23-28.

[3] Adapted from a quote by Madeleine L’Engle.

[4] Isaiah 55:9.

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