Leave Worship Better than You Found It

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Most of us can still recall some of those not so gentle reminders from our parents as they prepared us for an unsupervised visit to the home of a friend. Exhortations such as “remember who you are” or “don’t act like you were raised in a barn” were a couple of their standard lines. But the one that continues to resonate with me was the challenge to “leave their home better than you found it.”

What if we had the same attitude as we gathered together for worship? To leave a worship service better than we found it means we have to be willing to shift the topic away from me and my story to God and his story. Leaving it better means we’ll have to concentrate more on what we can offer or give instead of what we demand and deserve. So instead of asking, “what’s in it for me” we must instead start asking, “what’s in it of me.”

Leaving it better will certainly require some sacrifices. Paul wrote in the twelfth chapter of Romans, “Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God – which is your spiritual worship.” Charles Thomas Studd was an English missionary who served in several countries including China, India, and Africa. He exemplified this living sacrifice through his motto: “If Jesus Christ is God and died for me, then no sacrifice can be too great for me to make for him.”

Sacrificing in order to leave it better means we’ll have to be more focused on how we can selflessly add to gathered worship rather than selfishly subtracting from it. That willingness to surrender or let go means we won’t really lose anything. We’ll just pass it on to something or someone else.[1] Once we grasp the depth of that living sacrifice, then we’ll certainly leave gathered worship better than we found it.

 

[1] Adapted from Mitch Albom, The Five People You Meet in Heaven (New York: Hyperion, 2003).

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