Worship That Jumps the Shark

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The idiom Jump the Shark originated from a 1977 episode of the sitcom Happy Days when a water skiing, leather jacket wearing Fonzie actually jumped over a shark. In its fifth season, the show adulterated its story line in an attempt to boost its ratings.

The idiom is now used as a pejorative reference to anything that arbitrarily implements processes, programs, or even the use of novelty just to stay fresh or relevant.

Worship can also jump the shark if we over innovate, over stimulate, or over imitate just to reach or keep congregants. So instead of worship renewal based on biblical, theological, and historical foundations, each Sunday then becomes an exercise in trying to surpass the creativity and sometimes novelty of the previous Sunday.

Our worship may have Jumped the Shark if…

• We’ve terminated a worship leader based on age or appearance.

• We’re depending on a musical style alone to save or grow our church.

• We select songs in response to complaints or compliments.

• We shelve songs composed before or after the previous decade.

• Scripture and prayer have been minimized to make room for more music.

• Worship is used just to set the table for the sermon.

• Leaders are doing worship for congregants instead of helping them do it.

• We convey worship starts and stops with our opening and closing songs.

• We imitate other churches without considering the culture of our own.

• Our leaders seem to be more like cheerleaders than worship leaders.

• We believe dressing up or dressing down ensures its success.

• We think what we sing and how we sing it determines if God shows up.

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