Eugene Peterson on Worship

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Eugene Peterson

 

Eugene Peterson was a pastor, scholar, author and poet. On October 22, he finished his Long Obedience in the Same Direction. He left an indelible mark on various areas of Christian thought, including the following on worship.

 

Worship is the strategy by which we interrupt our preoccupation with ourselves and attend to the presence of God.

 

Christians don’t simply learn or study or use Scripture; we assimilate it, take it into our lives in such a way that it gets metabolized into acts of love, cups of cold water, missions into all the world, healing and evangelism and justice in Jesus’ name, hands raised in adoration of the Father, feet washed in company with the Son.

 

Worship does not satisfy our hunger for God; it whets our appetite.

 

Feelings are great liars. If Christians worshiped only when they felt like it, there would be precious little worship. We think that if we don’t feel something there can be no authenticity in doing it. But the wisdom of God says something different: that we can act ourselves into a new way of feeling much quicker than we can feel ourselves into a new way of acting.

 

Every call to worship is a call into the real world.

 

The most important thing a pastor does is stand in a pulpit every Sunday and say, “Let us worship God.” If that ceases to be the primary thing I do in terms of my energy, my imagination, and the way I structure my life, then I no longer function as a pastor.

 

I cannot fail to call the congregation to worship God, to listen to his Word, to offer themselves to God.

 

It’s essential for us to develop an imagination that is participatory. Art is the primary way in which this happens. It’s the primary way in which we become what we see or hear.

 

So here’s what I want you to do, God helping you: Take your everyday, ordinary life—your sleeping, eating, going-to-work, and walking-around life—and place it before God as an offering.

 

A Christian congregation is a company of praying men and women who gather, usually on Sundays, for worship, who then go into the world as salt and light. God’s Holy Spirit calls and forms this people. God means to do something with us, and he means to do it in community. We are in on what God is doing, and we are in on it together. 

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