Dec 9 2019

Ministry Move: Calling or Itchy Feet?

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Most of us don’t begin a ministry position believing we will only stay for a couple of years. Our intentions are noble to plant our lives for the long haul. But sometimes after exhausting all our good ideas we get bored, our leadership gets stale, our congregation gets restless and we get busy looking for another opportunity somewhere else.

But if the choice to stay in your present ministry position or look for another one is within your control (it sometimes isn’t), then you should be asking some fundamental questions before considering another move.

  • Has God released me from my call here?

Another place of ministry may seem more convenient, appealing, challenging, fulfilling and rewarding. But until God releases you to go there…stay here.

  • Am I running from something?

God didn’t promise you’d always be happy, revered, loved, appreciated or followed. So if you are running from relational dysfunction that isn’t resolved here, what makes you think it won’t follow you there?

  • Am I running to something?

If you are interested in another ministry just because it’s bigger, better, more prestigious or prominent, then your motivation might be ego instead of calling. If greener grass or several rungs up the ladder is the new you are running to, then you’ll inevitably be disappointed and so will they.

  • How might it impact my family?

Only considering your own ministry desires, needs and wants without recognizing how it might affect your family is not service, it is selfishness. If your ministry frequently moves your children away from their friends and foundations, then how can you expect them to even like church when they are no longer required to attend?

  • Am I ready to leave well?

It doesn’t matter if you are leaving by choice or force…leave well. If you go out swinging when you leave here it will always follow you when you go there. So leave with Ephesians 4:29 on your lips: “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”

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Nov 18 2019

10 Things Our Worship Songs Can’t Do

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10 Things Our Worship Songs Can’t Do

  • They can’t cause or cure our church conflicts.
  • They can’t grow or kill our church.
  • They can’t be contained in one genre or style.
  • They can’t begin or end our worship.
  • They can’t take the place of worship service Scripture.
  • They can’t cause us to worship.
  • They can’t prop up our bad theology.
  • They can’t take the place of worship service prayer.
  • They can’t usher us into the presence of God.
  • They can’t be our only act of worship.
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Oct 28 2019

50 Worship Leader Self-Evaluation Questions

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As worship leaders we sometimes don’t consider evaluating our own leadership until we receive complaints about something we are or aren’t doing or singing. Consequently, when those criticisms occur our responses are usually defensive rather than corrective.

Self-evaluation is preventive and proactive rather than defensive and reactive. So in order to avert or deter an unfavorable assessment from others, we should first ask some hard questions of ourselves. The following list of self-evaluation questions is not an exhaustive one but hopefully a place to begin.

  1. Are the services I plan and lead usually easy to follow or are they more often disorganized and disjointed?
  1. Am I planning worship each week for the congregation I’ve been called to lead or one I wish I had been called to lead?
  1. Are my verbal instructions and transitions ad-libbed and verbose or prepared and succinct?
  1. Am I encouraging passive worshipers by leading worship for them instead of with them?
  1. Do the people I put on the platform adequately represent the cultural, generational and spiritual characteristics of our congregation?
  1. Is my primary consideration for selecting worship team members musical or spiritual?
  1. Are the songs I lead on the platform evident in the life I lead off the platform?
  1. Am I selecting or not selecting songs and styles just because I personally like or don’t like them?
  1. Do I select song keys to intentionally encourage congregational participation or just to complement my own vocal range?
  1. Are the songs I select theologically sound and biblically accurate?
  1. Are any of my artistic, visual, verbal or musical expressions contrived or distracting? 
  1. Do I convey that worship starts and stops with our opening and closing songs?
  1. Do I begin worship planning each week with song titles or Scripture and prayer?
  1. Besides the latest songs, am I learning anything new?
  1. Since Sunday isn’t usually a Sabbath for me, when am I taking one?
  1. Do I ask how something might impact my family before asking how it might impact my worship leading?
  1. Have I surrounded myself with those who can protect me from my own stupidity?
  1. Am I spending a lot of time worshiping privately before leading worship publicly?
  1. Does always highlighting my playing and singing sometimes imply I don’t really care whether the congregation is singing or not?
  1. Do I wake up every morning feeling unqualified in my own power to do what God has called me to do?
  1. Am I taking care of myself spiritually, emotionally, physically and relationally?
  1. Have I gotten in the habit of using worship service prayer as a segue for musical elements instead of a divine conversation?
  1. Do I ever welcome divine interruptions in my service planning and leading?
  1. Am I casting vision for the future without denigrating the past?
  1. Do I determine the worship language of my congregations based on how I might appear to my worship leading friends?
  1. Am I able to worship when I’m not the primary leader?
  1. Is worship leading a calling for me or just convenient?
  1. Am I leading worship just because I don’t know how to do anything else?
  1. Am I making a conscious effort to pour into younger leaders or am I just trying to protect my territory?
  1. Am I threatened when someone on the team plays or sings better than I do?
  1. Am I depending on my musical skills alone to do what it’s only possible for God to do?
  1. Do I act like a gatekeeper by holding my congregation captive to my favorite worship styles and musical preferences?
  1. Does it seem like the services I plan tend to place more focus on the creative or the Creator?
  1. Am I spending more of my time developing my musical skills or my relationship skills?
  1. Do I find myself coasting or faking it more and more often?
  1. Am I approachable, available and accountable?
  1. Am I more concerned with playing right notes than having right relationships?
  1. Does it seem like I’m more of a cheerleader than a worship leader?
  1. Is it evident from my worship responses that I’m no longer amazed by God’s revelation?
  1. Does my leading lean toward manipulation instead of exhortation?
  1. Do I always seem to disappear when it’s time to set up or tear down?
  1. Am I showing up to rehearsals unprepared?
  1. Do I treat the worship team like backup musicians?
  1. Do I ever use my artistry and busyness as an excuse for laziness and lateness?
  1. Am I coasting at the first of the week causing me to scramble at the end of the week?
  1. Is the worship I’m leading challenging our congregation to be doers or just hearers?
  1. Am I regularly praying for and with those I lead?
  1. Are the songs I’m selecting giving our congregation an opportunity for celebration and contemplation?
  1. Do I offer a healthy balance of both familiar and new songs?
  1. Is it evident to others that I’m as much of a worship leader on Monday as I was on Sunday?
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Sep 16 2019

Worship Manager or Worship Leader?

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None of us alone have enough creativity or endurance to manage intergenerational and intercultural worship services week after week, year after year, with the same level of spiritual depth and creative tenacity each and every time.

So if you alone are trying to manage worshipers instead of lead them, you alone might receive all of the credit when something works. But you alone will also receive all of the credit when something doesn’t work. Trying to manage worship will eventually kill you and the worship of your congregation. Both may be slow deaths, but still terminal. Check out these comparisons to see where you’re landing.

 

A Manager acts as a gatekeeper by holding a congregation captive to style, traditionalism, form and structure.

A Leader understands that worship can’t be contained in one artistic expression, vehicle of communication, style, culture or context.

 

A Manager holds worship in check by retaining the power to make all decisions in order to influence results.

A Leader leverages available resources by tapping into the creative abilities of all in the planning, preparation and implementation of worship.

 

A Manager starts and stops worship.

A Leader continues worship.

 

A Manager does to.

A Leader does with.

 

A Manager prepares worshipers for Sunday events.

A Leader prepares worshipers for daily responses.

 

A Manager focuses on the institution.

A Leader focuses on the mission.

 

A Manager weighs the value of each team member.

A Leader creates value in each team member.

 

A Manager informs.

A Leader influences.

 

A Manager is autonomous.

A Leader is collaborative.

 

A Manager builds systems.

A Leader builds relationships.

 

A Manager imitates.

A Leader innovates.

 

A Manager instructs.

A Leader coaches.

 

A Manager creates goals.

A Leader casts vision.

 

A Manager sticks with how worship has worked.

A Leader works with how worship is stuck.

 

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Sep 11 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Sep 3 2019

Worship Leader and Worship Team Relational Contract

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A relational contract is a voluntary agreement between two or more parties that clarifies the expectations of their association in order to diminish conflict, encourage unity, inspire trust and foster mutual accountability.

What if worship leaders and worship teams planned, prepared and presented worship with a relational contractual agreement as one of the foundational components of their leadership? Can you imagine the worship health potential this could offer your congregation?

Unfortunately, this type of worship leading relationship sometimes doesn’t occur because leaders often function as independent contractors reliant on their own strength, ability, methods, processes and talent.

Implementing a relational contract will require a level of sacrifice and trust that is not guarded, territorial, defensive or competitive. It could serve as a useful guide to hold each other accountable to the unified goal of fulfilling and helping each other fulfill the mission of your church. But it will obviously never occur unless and until all parties are willing to embrace it.

Worship Leader/Worship Team Relational Contract

In an effort to more effectively lead, exhort, teach and model healthy worship, we as the primary worship leaders agree to adhere to the following relational guiding principles. We understand that the worship of our congregation will never be completely healthy until our relationship as its leaders is also healthy.

______________________, Worship Leader

______________________, Worship Team Member

______________________, Worship Team Member

______________________, Worship Team Member

______________________, Worship Team Member

______________________, Worship Team Member

We agree that we will…

  • Maintain a collaborative spirit that supports all of our worship gifts as complementary, not competitive.
  • Publicly and privately acknowledge the value of our unique callings, leadership styles, gifts and competencies.
  • Listen as often as we speak.
  • Partner in leading and teaching worship that moves beyond musical style alone to deeper biblical and theological content.
  • Communicate our disagreements in private without fear of retribution.
  • Make every effort to be approachable, available and accountable to each other.
  • Affirm in public; correct, instruct, coach and mentor in private; and pastor each other at all times.
  • Sacrifice individually for the sake of the body corporately.
  • Initiate intentional significant conversations that include our hopes, dreams, goals, expectations, plans, concerns and evaluations.
  • Invest in the personal and spiritual development of each other with no ulterior motive.
  • Preserve loyalty, trust, morality, respect and friendship.
  • Work toward a common philosophy of worship and ministry.
  • Pray consistently for and with each other.
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Aug 28 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Aug 26 2019

Play the Ball Where the Monkey Drops It

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golfWhen the British colonized India in the 1820’s they also introduced the game of golf. A unique problem was quickly discovered, however, after building the first golf course in Calcutta. Monkeys in the trees surrounding the course would drop down, snag the golf balls from the fairways and then carry and drop them in other locations.

In response, officials tried building tall fences around the fairways and greens but the monkeys climbed right over them. Attempts to frighten them just seemed to amuse and entertain them. Workers even tried to capture and relocate the monkeys only to have others appear.

A stellar drive down the middle of the fairway might be picked up and dropped in the rough. A hook or slice producing a terrible lie might be tossed back into the fairway. So golfers quickly learned that if they wanted to play on this course they couldn’t always control the outcome of the game. Resilience finally helped the officials and golfers come up with a solution. They added a new rule to their golf games at this course in Calcutta…Play the ball where the monkey drops it.[1]

Resilience is also a great characteristic for worship leaders to learn and develop. It encourages recovery with grace instead of overreaction in anger when the service doesn’t go as intended. Resilience averts relational catastrophe when people don’t do or plans don’t go as well as we prayed and practiced for them to. Even though worship leaders have the responsibility to prepare with excellence they must also learn how to present with pliability since the outcome of the service is not really theirs to control.

So the next time the organist and pianist begin a song introduction in different keys; the next time the rhythm guitarist forgets to move his capo; the next time the tech team doesn’t turn on your microphone or forward the text to the next slide; the next time the soprano section comes in too soon; the next time your bass player misses the first service because he forgot to set his alarm; or the next time your pastor cuts a well-rehearsed song right before the service to provide more sermon time…Play the ball where the monkey drops it.

 

[1] Adapted from Tara Branch, “It’s Not What’s Happening, It’s How You Respond,” Life, HuffPost Plus. May 3, 2013. https://www.huffpost.com/entry/acceptance_b_3211053. (accessed Monday, August 27, 2019).

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Jul 31 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Jun 17 2019

Childish Responses to Worship Change

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When the disciples asked Jesus who the greatest is in the kingdom of heaven, he responded by calling a little child and asking him to stand among them. Then he said, “Whoever humbles himself like a child is the greatest” (Matt 18:1-4).

When churches start discussing worship change the humble character of the congregants is often one of the first things to go. Character is the outward manifestation of our inward nature or qualities. It isn’t innate so it must be learned and practiced or it’s easily forgotten or ignored, especially when we don’t get our way. Character indicates who we really are even when conflict arises.

The character of children could help the rest of us remember and relearn some of those forgotten traits when we’re facing worship change that is not always our preference.

Wonder – Worship should cause us to be curious, fascinated, surprised and captivated. Children radiate these characteristics, we seldom do. Wide-eyed worship wonder has been replaced by the controlled and scripted. We are rarely wowed, amazed or awed. As adults we have transformed the wonder of God into a scheduled event that is explainable and rational.

Cooperation – Children learn early that always expecting to get your way, being a bully, not resolving conflict with kind words, not considering the needs of others and not seeing things from another’s point of view are not an option. When our worship practices move too quickly or not quick enough toward change we’ve forgotten how to share and play fair.

Tolerance – Children seem to have a higher capacity to accept differences than we do. They learn intolerance from us. Churches need to invert that practice. Worship intolerance is often manifested musically and stylistically. Tolerance doesn’t cause us to compromise biblically, theologically or doctrinally but often asks us to accommodate culturally, contextually and systematically.

Resilience – Resilience is that childhood elasticity that allows them to recover quickly from radical change. It’s the willingness to give things a try with an attitude of flexibility. Worship resilience averts relational and theological catastrophe through a culture of pliability. Pliability allows worshipers to weather change without getting bent out of shape.

When considering how we’ll respond the next time our worship changes we just need to be reminded what we once learned as a child. And when we do, it will certainly give us new meaning to “Train up a child in the way he should go; even when he is old he will not depart from it” (Prov 22:6).

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Jun 12 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Jun 5 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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May 1 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Apr 15 2019

In Whom Are You Investing?

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I was challenged a couple of decades ago while attending a worship leadership conference to make a list of individuals who had intentionally taken the time to encourage me in my early ministry years. The clinician gave us time to complete our list and then asked, “Have you told those individuals how much you value that investment?” After returning home from the conference I drafted half a dozen thank you notes to send to those mentors I had listed. Paul Williams was on that list.

Nearly four decades ago I began my first full-time ministry position. Paul Williams served as a music and worship pastor in another church in our city. In my first week or two of ministry he stopped by my office and didn’t ask, but told me he was going to pick me up the following Saturday to attend a music workshop with him. This wizened sage of music and worship ministry (he was probably 40) invested in a 24-year-old worship beginner not for what he could get from me, but what he could offer to me.

My first ministry position was one of those learning experiences that many of us have endured in ministry. Paul knew the history of our congregation and the challenges I would face way before I figured it out. He never offered a lot of useless advice or platitudes when I was struggling to stay or questioning whether I missed God’s calling. He just became a friend who graciously listened, encouraged and was available every time I needed his wisdom.

Before Paul died in 2010 from complications of Acute Myelocytic Leukemia, he had served as Music and Worship Pastor for 35 years and then in 1992 began serving full-time as a lyricist, clinician and composer. Even though I moved to a different state, Paul continued to send me packets of his new music every few months with a humorous personal note of encouragement and a loving note to my family. I’m sure others received similar packets and notes from Paul since my relationship with him was not unique. He just had the ability to make each person feel that way. I’m not certain I’d still be in ministry today if Paul Williams hadn’t taken the time to help shape me then.

Investing in others means we make deposits of our time and talents so the return will be compounded for future withdrawals. Our success in worship ministry will not be judged just on how well we did it ourselves, but on how well we helped others do it too. So if we want great worship leaders to replace us in the future, then like my friend Paul we must invest in those not yet great worship leaders in the present.

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Apr 1 2019

Take Courage Worship Leader…He Is Able!

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he is ableWhen worship ministry feels like being caught in the force of a riptide that pulls you away from the safety of shore; When the swift current regularly drags you under, rolls you on the sandy bottom, scratches up your elbows and knees and fills your swim trunks with sand; When it seems to take longer each time for the current to lose its strength, release you and allow you to swim to shore;

Remember to take courage in the assurance that He Is Able to do above and beyond all that you ask or think according to the power that works in you (Eph. 3:20).

Take Courage…

  • When no generation is ever really happy musically…He is able.
  • When your ministry shelf life is moving toward the expiration date because you are no longer young enough or trim enough…He is able.
  • When you are always a step behind musically, technologically and culturally…He is able.
  • When you are tempted to quit every Monday morning…He is able.
  • When you wish you served someplace, anyplace else…He is able.
  • When you are always the first one to arrive and last one to leave…He is able.
  • When no amount of rehearsal can make your group presentable…He is able.
  • When staff collaboration actually means silent obedience…He is able.
  • When needed change is never well received…He is able.
  • When you feel like no one is holding your rope as you start to slip…He is able.
  • When date night with your spouse is the worship team potluck…He is able.
  • When you feel like you are missing out on your children’s lives…He is able.
  • When you have been terminated for any or no reason…He is able.
  • When your creativity has been exhausted and burnout is causing you to coast…He is able.
  • When you don’t have the resolve to take care of yourself spiritually, physically and emotionally…He is able.

“Now to Him who is able to keep you from stumbling, and to make you stand in the presence of His glory blameless with great joy, to the only God our Savior, through Jesus Christ our Lord, be glory, majesty, dominion and authority, before all time and now and forever. Amen” (Jude 1:24-25).

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Mar 6 2019

Worship Word Wednesday

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Dec 19 2018

Worship Word Wednesday

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Dec 12 2018

Worship Word Wednesday

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Nov 28 2018

Worship Word Wednesday

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Oct 15 2018

4 Signs Your Worship Team Has the Sense of a Goose

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gooseIt’s difficult for the worship of your church to be healthy if the relationships of its platform leaders aren’t. Healthy worship teams embrace a unified goal of helping each other help others to worship.

Unhealthy worship teams function as independent contractors who play and perform dependent on their own talent alone. So even if those team members are producing individually, you’ll never experience extraordinary worship leadership until you agree you’re all in this together.

Every fall thousands of geese fly from Canada to the southern part of the United States to escape the bitter cold of winter. Worship teams could better learn how to work together by observing the V-formation flight of these geese.

4 Signs Your Worship Team Has the Sense of a Goose

  • You share leadership with each other

The goose flying in front of the V-formation expends the most energy since it’s the first to break the flow of air that provides lift for the geese that follow. So when the lead goose tires, it moves to the rear of the formation where the resistance is lightest. This rotation happens perpetually throughout their journey. Consequently, each member of the flock serves as a leader as well as a follower.

  • You draft for each other

According to scientists, when the geese fly in a V-formation they create an uplift draft for the bird immediately following. So the entire flock achieves a 71 percent greater flying range than if each goose flew on its own. So they arrive at the destination quicker because they are lifted up by their combined energy and enthusiasm.

  • You cheer for each other

Geese frequently honk as they fly in formation. Scientists speculate this honking is a way to communicate and cheer for each other. Those repeated honks announce all is well as an encouragement to those out front to stay at it and keep on keeping on. They are in essence reminding each other that, “we’re all in this together.”

  • You protect each other

Scientists have discovered that when a goose becomes ill or is injured and has to drop out of the formation, two other geese will also fall out of formation to stay with the weakened goose. And they stay with that goose to protect if from predators until it is either able to fly again or dies.

It’s foundational to the senses of geese to work together. Whether they’re rotating, flapping, honking or helping. Their combined efforts enable them to accomplish what they were created to do.

What could your worship team achieve if you too had the sense of a goose?

Renowned evangelist and preacher, Vance Havner used to say, “Snowflakes are frail little things. But if you get enough of them together they can stop traffic.”

The author of Ecclesiastes said it this way, “Two are better than one because they have a good reward for their efforts. For if either falls, his companion can lift him up; but pity the one who falls without another to lift him up” (Ecc. 4:9-10).

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Oct 1 2018

Unified Worship: A Tree of 40 Fruit

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40 FruitBeing unified is the state of being united, linked or joined together as one in spite of diversities and differences. Uniformity, on the other hand, is the state or quality of being the same. A healthy worshiping congregation requires unity but not necessarily uniformity.

A.W. Tozer wrote, “Has it ever occurred to you that one hundred pianos all tuned to the same fork are automatically tuned to each other? They are of one accord by being tuned, not to each other, but to another standard to which each one must individually bow.”[1]

According to Paul, being unified is “striving together as one for the faith of the gospel” (Phil 1:27). So we can exercise a variety of different worship gifts, callings and styles and still be unified as long as our root solidarity is not our worship expressions but the gospel.

Art professor Sam Van Aken combined his love for art and farming to develop an incredible Tree of 40 Fruit. In 2008 Van Aken learned that an orchard at the New York State Agricultural Experiment Station was about to be shut down because of a lack of funding.

To lose this orchard would render many of these rare fruit varieties extinct. So to preserve them, Van Aken bought the orchard and spent several years chip grafting parts of the many varieties of trees onto a single fruit tree.

In the spring, Van Aken’s Tree of 40 Fruit reveals a stunning patchwork of pink, white, red and purple blossoms, which then produce an array of plums, peaches, apricots, nectarines, cherries and almonds. The roots of each of these trees are united even though the fruit or outward expressions are diverse.

Van Aken indicated that each Tree of 40 Fruit provides the perfect amount and variety of fruit. So rather than having a uniform single variety that produces more fruit than you know what to do with, each tree offers just the right amount of each of the 40 varieties.

The Apostle Paul said it this way to the church at Corinth, “The body is a unit, though it is made up of many parts; and though all its parts are many, they form one body. But in fact God has arranged the parts in the body, every one of them, just as he wanted them to be. If they were all one part, where would the body be? As it is, there are many parts but one body” (I Cor 12:12, 18-20).

 

[1] A.W. Tozer, The Pursuit of God (Vancouver, BC: Eremitical Press, 2009), 90.

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Sep 24 2018

Senior Pastor…Why Aren’t You Singing?

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singDear Non-Singing Pastor,

We depend on you as a primary worship leader for our congregation. We agree that your leadership centers more on worship through the Word and Table than through the music. And we understand and affirm that worship can’t be contained in one expression such as music.

But it is evident from Scripture that singing is a significant response to God’s revelation (Ps 63:5; Eph 5:19: Col 3:15-17). When writing about the future of Jerusalem, the minor prophet Zephaniah wrote, “The Lord your God is with you, he is mighty to save. He will take great delight in you, he will quiet you with his love, he will rejoice over you with singing” (Zeph 3:17).

When the circumstances of life discourage us from verbalizing our songs, the Father surrounds us with songs of deliverance (Ps 32:7). And when we can’t find adequate words to express our love to the Father, Jesus as our worship leader sings with us (Heb 8:1-2; 2:12). So if the Father is singing over us and Jesus is singing with us, we have to ask how you can keep from singing?

When you choose not to sing it causes us to wonder if you really view the musical worship elements as an appetizer before the main course or the warm-up band before the headliner. And when you study sermon notes instead of singing it gives the impression you are unprepared, reminiscent of a freshman cramming for a final exam.

Pastor, we desire worship that is a continuous conversation with a variety of worship expressions instead of just stand-alone elements of music and preaching. So we long for you to teach and model active and fully engaged participatory worship instead of passively giving permission to others not to sing too.

So in humility we ask that you join us in full-throated singing so that all of our voices, including yours, might unite in communal utterances of praise, thanksgiving, confession, dedication, commitment, lament and response. And when this occurs our songs will communicate vertically and horizontally in a unified voice so compelling that it can’t possibly be silenced (Ps 30:12).

Sincerely,

Your Singing Congregation

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Aug 13 2018

Why Worship Leaders Should Get A Real Job

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jobNow that I have your attention, leading worship is indeed a worthy calling and vocation that requires preparation, education and skills. And yes, it is a real job. But what if opportunities were no longer available for you to lead worship vocationally?

What if you needed to voluntarily or were forced involuntarily to step aside from vocational worship leadership for an interim or extended period of time? Or if you’re a student preparing for vocational worship ministry, what if you don’t immediately land a position after graduation? What would or could you do in these instances to provide for your family while still responding to God’s call? Some of us have found ourselves in similar situations only to realize we are not trained or are not training to do anything else.

Statistics show that 95% of churches average 350 or less in worship and that 75-80% of those churches average 150 or less. Forced terminations, unhealthy staff relationships and ageism are all unfortunate realities. Church planting movements have amplified the need for additional volunteer and part time worship leaders. And even larger, more established congregations are no longer realizing the need for full-time worship and music staff as they try to stretch their financial resources to accommodate their various generational, cultural, ethnic and multisite needs.

With those statistics in mind, the present and future reality seems to indicate that the need for full-time music and worship leaders is on the decline. In other words, it appears there are and will continue to be more prepared full-time leaders than full time places for them to serve. So reality dictates that while preparing for worship leadership we should also be learning additional marketable skills.

For this to occur, we must first acknowledge that a call to bivocational ministry is not a mediocre calling but is in fact a call to full-time ministry that just happens to occur not only when we gather at church but also when we disperse to the marketplace. We must also encourage our Christian colleges and seminaries to more actively challenge students preparing for worship ministry to also learn other vocational skills. We must agree that it is never too soon or too late to learn something new. And we must affirm that learning an additional skill doesn’t compromise our calling but in fact enhances it by allowing us to communicate in other worship languages beyond choirs and chord charts.

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May 21 2018

Worship Pastors Need A Sabbatical Too

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running on emptyA sabbatical is a way for congregations to invest in the future ministry of their worship pastor and their church. This extended time away every few years allows their worship pastor time to step aside from the daily responsibilities of preparing and resourcing rehearsals and services. And it allows them time to renew their bodies, refresh their souls and reaffirm their calling to God and their church.

Many churches generously offer their worship pastor time away for vacation, sick leave and continuing education. But what most of those churches don’t realize is the amount of preparation required for their worship pastor to actually leave town. It’s almost easier not to go.

Worship pastors obviously have to secure substitutes for each of those rehearsals and services while they are away, but that is just the beginning. They also have to prepare all of the choral music, band and/or orchestra music, rhythm charts, sound, lighting and projection needs, orders of service and worship guides. Then they have to communicate all of those details with the various participants so those people are all prepared to lead in their absence. Like I said, it’s almost easier not to go.

We are often aware of the investment our worship pastors make in our own lives. What we don’t often calculate is the cumulative time and energy required when multiplied by the combined membership of those in the worship ministry and the rest of the congregation.

We depend on our worship pastors to teach and admonish us with psalms, hymns and spiritual songs. They are often our counselors, mentors, leaders, friends and spiritual advisors. When our families are in crisis we look to them to referee, repair and reclaim. And yet at the same time we also expect them to challenge and encourage us with stellar worship every Sunday.

So if we all have those same expectations, then how can we not expect the stress of that responsibility to eventually take its toll? How can we expect them to continue to lead us where they can’t perpetually have the resolve to go themselves? Phillip Yancey wrote, “I wonder how much more effective our churches would be if we made the pastors spiritual health, not the pastors efficiency our number one priority?”

Offering a sabbatical to your worship pastor won’t endanger the worship ministry of your church, it will in fact enhance and extend it. It will give your beloved worship pastor permission to rest, heal, recharge and learn for future ministry. And it will give your congregation the unique opportunity to practice stewarding what God has entrusted to you, the well being of that faithful worship pastor.

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Apr 16 2018

A Letter to Pastors and Worship Leaders in Conflict

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conflictDear Pastor and Worship Leader in Conflict,

You’ll never convince your congregation to live in community as long as the two of you continue to live in isolation. If Jesus as your model for ministry called those with whom he served his friends, then shouldn’t you be doing the same?

It might seem like you’re high functioning now by depending on your own strengths and gifts alone. But even when you realize some success alone there will come a time when you will fail, also alone. So maybe it’s time to figure out what’s contributing to your conflict. Maybe it’s time to admit all your strife didn’t originate in someone else’s office. Maybe it’s time to spend as much time on your relationship as you’ve been spending on ministry job placement sites. And maybe it’s time to stop expecting the people in the pews to be unified when the people on the platform aren’t.

Maybe you are in conflict because you’re always willing to pastor the members of your congregation, but not each other. None of us are immune from the struggles of life such as depression, physical or mental health issues, marital conflict, errant children or financial stress. So if the two of you aren’t willing to pastor each other when you’re facing similar issues, who will? And pastoring each other will help protect you both from your own stupidity.

Maybe you are in conflict because you don’t love or really even like each other that much. Scripture reminds us to love God first, then our neighbors as ourselves. Your closest neighbor beyond your family should be those with whom you serve in ministry. So what might occur if you learned to love each other more than you loved getting your own way?

Maybe you are in conflict because you aren’t praying for each other. Praying that God will call one of you to another ministry is not praying for each other, it’s selfishly praying for yourself. Praying for each other requires communication, vulnerability and trust. Interceding for each other may not change your ministry colleague but it can sure change you.

Maybe you are in conflict because you never share ministry together. Just because your ministry position allows you to have the last word doesn’t mean it has to be your word. Shared ministry publicly and privately affirms the calling of each other. Sharing means you are no longer guarded or territorial since you’ll both get the credit and blame. The result is that successes are maximized and failures minimized.

Maybe you are in conflict because you never play together. You encourage your congregants to develop communal relationships of fellowship and fun, yet the two of you won’t even grab coffee or play golf together. In the Acts 2 church they spent time together, had things in common, broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts. Those relationships are often foreign to the two of you.

And finally, just maybe once you’ve worked through some of these conflicts you’ll realize it’t true that two are better than one, because you’ll have a better return on your labor. And you’ll also realize that if you fall, someone will be beside you to help you up (Eccl 4:9-10).

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Mar 19 2018

Scratching the Ministry Move Itch

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dream jobMost of us don’t begin a new ministry position believing we’ll only stay for a couple of years. We have noble intentions to plant our lives for the long haul. But after we’ve exhausted our two-year recipe of ideas we often get bored, our leadership gets stale, our congregation gets restless and we get busy looking for another ministry somewhere else.

If you are itching for another position just because it’s bigger or better, more prestigious or prominent, then your motivation might be ego instead of calling. If greener grass or rungs up the ladder is the new you are running to, you’ll inevitably be disappointed again after a couple of years and so will they.

Another place of ministry may seem more convenient, appealing, challenging, fulfilling and rewarding. But until God releases you to go there, he expects you to stay here. His calling is a personal invitation to carry out a unique and sometimes difficult task. And it’s a strong inner impulse prompted by conviction, not convenience.

God never promised we’d always be happy, revered, loved, appreciated or followed. He did, however, promise he wouldn’t leave or forsake us. So instead of focusing on ministry job placement sites, we should keep our eyes fixed on Jesus. It’s a discipline that is not always easy but it produces a harvest of righteousness when we are trained by it (Heb 12:2,11).

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Jan 22 2018

How Will They Remember Your Worship Leadership?

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legacyThere will come a time when God calls you to a new worship ministry position; you’ll be forced out of your present position; you’ll voluntarily step aside for a season; or you will retire from worship ministry completely.

So if or when one of these scenarios occurs, what will your church remember more about your worship leadership?

Will they remember…
  • How many new songs or new people’s names you knew?
  • How you uplifted or undermined your pastor?
  • How much you loved playing with your kids or playing your guitar?
  • How much theology or musicology you knew?
  • How you strived for harmony or sowed dissonance?
  • How you were too busy or welcomed divine interruptions?
  • How obsessed you were with fixing broken relationships or wrong notes?
  • How you controlled or empowered worship?
  • How you were a lifelong learner or didn’t need to learn anything new?
  • How you were threatened by evaluation or thrived on collaboration?
  • How you treated them as passive spectators or active participators?
  • How you planned and led with them or your next place of ministry in mind?
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Nov 20 2017

Please Stop with the Worship Revolutions!

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Revolution

In the rush to do something new and fresh or in an attempt to imitate another congregation, worship planners and leaders sometimes radically change the worship practices of their church. With total disregard for the foundations that framed their existing practices they arbitrarily blow up their worship without considering where the pieces might land.

Worship change by revolution always causes unnecessary pain and relational conflict. So maybe if adjustments are indeed necessary, what most of those congregations actually need is not a revolution but instead a reevaluation.

Revolution is the forcible overthrow or renunciation of an existing system or structure in order to substitute another. It is the repudiation and thorough replacement of what presently exists without considering what still holds value. This radical and pervasive change most often occurs suddenly without giving consideration to the potential fall-out. And in a revolution…one side always loses.

Reevaluation is the contemplation or examination of something again in order to make adjustments or form new opinions about it. It offers a congregation an opportunity to consider how they can prayerfully add to rather than randomly take away. Reevaluation gives them time to change or get better at what they are presently doing through a unified process of rethinking, revisiting and reinvestigating. And in a reevaluation…all sides are considered.

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Nov 6 2017

Facing Worship Leader Ageism…Stick the Landing!

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gymnasticsA gymnastic competition can be won or lost in the landing. So even if you flip, vault, tuck and twist well during the routine, it isn’t considered a success unless you can also stick the landing.

Halftime is over and some of us are even well into the last quarter of our worship-leading career. We’ve accumulated decades of knowledge, experience and practical application so we know how to work smarter. But just working smarter doesn’t seem to be helping some of us finish well. So how can we stay viable, battle ageism and keep from coasting in order to stick the landing?

Learn something new – When we lose the resolve to learn, we lose the resolve to lead. Depending only on what we once learned means we’re only prepared to lead a worship ministry that no longer exists. So it’s never too soon or too late to learn something new. Eric Hoffer wrote, “It is the learners who inherit the future. The learned usually find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists.”

Force Quit – Computer programs are sometimes slow or can even freeze up and become unresponsive. Selecting Force Quit reboots and reinstates the original well functioning settings. Quitting doesn’t mean we stop doing worship ministry or have to leave our present position. It just means recalibrating for a fresh start where we are now.

Study a foreign language – Famed basketball coach John Wooden stated, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” So even though we might be fluent in previous worship languages, we also need to learn the musical and technological vernacular of modern worship and what might follow it.

Get another job – Agreeing that worship leader ageism is unjust or theologically suspect doesn’t change its reality. So we can choose to live in a constant state of fear in the second half or we can proactively prepare in case ageism does occur. Learning additional marketable skills doesn’t compromise our calling, it actually enhances that calling beyond choirs and chord charts. And retooling could allow us to extend our shelf life and stick the landing where we are now or where God might call us next.

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Aug 21 2017

If Only Is Holding Worship Hostage

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if onlyWe use if only statements to express a strong desire for things to be different. Those two words are sometimes uttered to nostalgically hold on to the past in order to place stipulations on the present. And they are also used just as often to discount or disparage the traditional in an attempt to elevate the modern.

So when it comes to worship, these two words are often voiced to selfishly hold a congregation hostage until certain demands are met:

If only we would sing more or less hymns.

If only we had a younger worship leader.

If only the songs weren’t so trite and repetitive.

If only we still had a choir.

If only our services were more creative.

If only we had a better worship band.

If only the volume wasn’t so high and lights so low.

If only the attire wasn’t so casual or formal.

If only we were still holding a hymnal.

If only they would let my granddaughter sing a solo.

If only we were like that other church.

If only we still had special music.

If only the song sets and sermons weren’t so long.

If only the people looked and spoke more like us.

If only we talked about money less and politics more.

If only the text and tunes weren’t so archaic.

If only our present leader was more like our previous leader.

If only worshipers can hold a congregation hostage to styles and structures by constantly pointing the conversation back to themselves. What they need, what they like, what they want, what they deserve or what they’ve earned often determines their level of participation. But when if only stipulations beyond the revelation of God must be met before congregants are willing to engage in worship, what they are actually worshiping may be their own selfish desires.

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Aug 7 2017

10 Signs You’re Having an Affair with Worship Ministry

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affairWhy are worship leaders finding it so difficult to balance family and ministry responsibilities? It’s possible those demands and expectations are church or church leadership imposed. But it’s also equally likely they are self-imposed. Some of us are willing to sacrifice almost all waking hours away from our spouse if it means we will have the largest choir or most renowned worship band. Our biblical call to lead others to be a living sacrifice will never ask us to sacrifice our marriage. Doing so would be a sign we’re having an extramarital affair with worship ministry.

10 Signs You’re Having an Affair with Worship Ministry
  • You always ask how something might impact your worship leading before asking how it might impact your marriage.
  • You find more in common with worship team members and consequently, compare your spouse to them.
  • You expect your spouse to have the same passion for your worship leadership as you do.
  • You attend worship conferences in exotic locations but never have enough time for a romantic weekend getaway.
  • Most text messages are to/from band members instead of your spouse.
  • You spend your evenings on YouTube, Spotify and Planning Center so you’re not really home emotionally and relationally even when you’re home physically.
  • You assume leading worship is a higher calling than what your spouse is called to.
  • You have a different spiritual persona on the platform than you do at home.
  • The newest song text instead of the name of your spouse is on your lips when you go to sleep.
  • The affirmation you get from leading worship feeds you more than the affirmation you get at home.
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Jun 5 2017

When Ministry Is Hard…Remember

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RememberWhen ministry feels like being caught in the force of a riptide that pulls you away from the safety of the shore; When the current drags you under again and again and rolls you around on the sandy bottom; and When it seems to take longer each time for the undercurrent to release its grip and allow you to gasp for air…Remember that He reaches down from heaven, takes your hand and pulls you out of deep waters. (Psalm 18:16)

When you worry if your children will even like church when they are no longer required to attend…Remember that Jesus loves your children too and wants them to inherit the Kingdom of God. (Lk 18:15-17)

When your ministry shelf life seems to be moving quickly toward the expiration date…Remember to run this ministry endurance race by fixing your eyes on Jesus since He is the source and perfecter of it. (Heb 12:1-2)

When congregants target your family because they are upset with you…Remember the Lord is your strength and defense so you don’t have to be. (Ps 46:1)

When you are tempted to quit every Monday morning…Remember to be strong and don’t give up, your work will be rewarded. (2 Chr 15:7)

When you have to schedule your family vacation after the youth mission trip, children’s camp and Vacation Bible School, but before the fall kickoff…Remember to learn from Jesus’ example of rest by wearing his yoke, not your own. (Mt 11:28-30)

When the senior adult potluck dinner is the only date night with your spouse…Remember that New Testament church leaders were required to first demonstrate faithfulness at home before being considered for ministry. (1 Tim 3:1-13)

When you are the latest forced termination victim…Remember to be confident and courageous since the Lord will be with you wherever you go. (Josh 1:9)

When it seems like no one is holding your rope, standing in the gap or watching your back…Remember you have a great cloud of witnesses surrounding you. (Heb 12:1)

When you are always the first one to arrive and last one to leave…Remember you are doing it in His strength, not your own. (Isa 40:29)

When your creativity has been exhausted and burnout is causing you to coast…Remember that He is the potter and you are the clay so it’s the work of His hands, not yours. (Isa 64:8)

When you are attacked for initiating much needed change…Remember the Lord hates those who stir up conflict in the community. (Prov 6:16-19)

When you don’t have the resolve to take care of yourself spiritually, physically and emotionally…Remember that He renews your strength when you are worn out and increases your drive when reserves are depleted. (Isa 40:29-31)

RememberSince we have such a large cloud of witnesses surrounding us, let us lay aside every weight and the sin that so easily ensnares us. Let us run with endurance the race that lies before us, keeping our eyes on Jesus, the source and perfecter of our faith, who for the joy that lay before Him endured a cross and despised the shame and has sat down at the right hand of God’s throne. For consider Him who endured such hostility from sinners against Himself, so that you won’t grow weary and lose heart. (Heb 12:1-3)

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Apr 24 2017

An Open Letter to the Potential Pulpit Bully

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pulpitDear Potential Pulpit Bully,

When Theodore Roosevelt coined the term “bully pulpit,” he observed that his position of influence as president gave him a unique platform from which to persuade, exhort, instruct and inspire. Roosevelt famously used the word bully as an adjective meaning great, superb, excellent or wonderful.

As a pastor, you have been given a similar position of influence from which to speak out, advocate and encourage. Your unique bully pulpit gives you a platform for persuasion, exhortation, instruction and inspiration. It is dangerous, however, if you choose to invert that bully pulpit from a place of influence to a position of control. Transposing from advocacy to autocracy will degrade your platform from a bully pulpit to the platform of a pulpit bully.

There is no virtue in bullying disguised as righteous indignation. So pastor, if you give in to that temptation you’ll believe all problems originate in someone else’s office. You’ll reject cooperation, compromise and kindness in order to guard territory and filter information. You’ll outgrow the need to learn anything new. You won’t share ministry because accountability will threaten your position of authority. And collaboration will always be suspect because you’ll view those with different perspectives as insubordinate.

Once you adopt an attitude of entitlement and invulnerability you may achieve compliance from others but rarely buy-in. So even those within your so-called inner circle will submit to your leadership out of fear not friendship, out of caution not loyalty, out of submission not conviction. As a result, your position will also be one of profound loneliness.

So pastor, is being a pulpit bully really what God intended when he called some to be apostles, some to be prophets and some to be evangelists? Maybe giving in to that temptation is just the fear of losing control of something that was not yours to begin with. So it’s still not too late to realize that the final word doesn’t always have to be yours. There’s time to pray and plan together with others as partners instead of pawns. It’s never too late to pastor with an attitude of mutuality with no ulterior motive. And when you do, your church and staff relationships will never be the same.

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Mar 6 2017

Some Worship Leaders Should Just Quit

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QuitChristianity Today recently published an article indicating that nearly one-fourth of all active ministers have been forced out at some point in their ministry. These termination statistics remind us that the choice to stay is not always ours to make.

But what if we are or aren’t doing some things that are contributing to an early ministry departure? Aren’t we called to do everything we can possibly do here instead of just hoping it will be different when we move there?

Relational instead of musical deficiencies seem to be at the root of many forced worship leader terminations. And yet, most worship leaders spend the majority of their time just trying to improve themselves musically. The reality is we can never learn and teach enough new songs to make up for relationship and leadership failures.

So it’s time to quit doing or not doing those things that might be contributing to your discontent or the discontent of those to whom you are accountable.

Quit…

  • Coming in late and leaving early.
  • Blaming others when you drop the ball.
  • Using artistry as an excuse for laziness.
  • Depending on music alone to fix relationships.
  • Assuming all problems began somewhere else.
  • Trying to pastor from the platform alone.
  • Looking for shortcuts or excuses and pay the rent.
  • Coasting at the beginning of the week and scrambling at the end.
  • Coming to rehearsals and meetings unprepared.
  • Trying to make changes without seeking buy-in.
  • Expecting others to change first.
  • Viewing relationships as artistic interruptions.
  • Holding volunteers to a bar you aren’t trying to reach.
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Jan 30 2017

Preemptive Strike: Evaluating Worship from the Inside

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evaluationSome worship leaders don’t consider evaluating their worship services until they receive complaints about something they are or aren’t doing or singing. Consequently, their responses are usually defensive rather than evaluative.

A preemptive strike is an action that is intentionally initiated to keep another inevitable action from occurring. It is preventive and proactive in order to deter a more unfavorable action or attack from transpiring.

Evaluation is already occurring in the halls and parking lots. So why wouldn’t we want to preempt those conversations with a process that encourages worship renewal instead of just as a response to worship conflict?

Evaluating worship from the inside is an internal process of enlisting individuals and groups from within your congregation to regularly evaluate present worship structures and practices.

Inside or internal evaluators already understand the culture, doctrines and personnel assets or liabilities that frame your worship preparation and implementation. So they have a vested interest in the process and results since it too is their church.

One area of caution, though, is since the evaluators have a more personal interest there is sometimes the danger of ideological evaluation. Those evaluations can be based on likes, dislikes and styles instead of biblical and theological content. But the benefits definitely outweigh the risk of encountering the occasional ideologue.

Implementing a process of internal evaluation requires a level of humility and sacrifice from leaders. Those leaders who willingly and selflessly share the responsibilities will no longer receive all of the credit for successes but they also won’t receive all of the credit for failures. Consider some of the following preemptive evaluation suggestions:

INTERNAL EVALUATION SUGGESTIONS

  • Develop an evaluative team for worship planning and follow-up evaluation. Include musicians, theologians, technicians, artists, etc.
  • Video the platform personnel (including the pastor) as an evaluative tool for the team. Look for: genuineness, preparedness, idiosyncrasies, platform presence, vocal clarity, language clarity, etc.
  • Video the congregation before, during and after worship services to evaluate how or if they are participating.
  • Enlist multi-generational and multi-ethnic congregants to respond to questions regarding the relevance of worship to their generation or culture.
  • Ask evaluation team members to sit in various places during worship services to consider volume, balance, pace, flow, content, congregational participation, etc.
  • Enlist non-musicians to respond to musical questions.
  • Ask an educator to evaluate language and grammar usage of platform leaders.
  • Encourage non-technical congregants to respond to projection, sound, lighting and other technical/logistical questions.
  • Implement platform personnel peer-to-peer evaluations.
  • Keep it simple. Don’t attempt to evaluate too much at a time.
  • Design evaluations to minimize the focus on style and personal preferences. Avoid “I like” or “I don’t like” questions.
  • Ensure evaluations aren’t used to manipulate or provide justification for biases.
  • Evaluate strengths as well as weaknesses.
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Jan 3 2017

Uptight Worship Leaders Need Fartleks in 2017

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runningFartlek is not a middle school bodily function joke. It is an actual running term of Swedish origin that literally means “speed play.” Running fartleks involves varying the pace throughout your run, alternating between sprints and slow jogs.

Unlike traditional interval training that involves specific timed or measured segments, fartleks are intentionally unstructured. Adding them to your training plan is a fun way to give new life to monotonous distance runs as well as rigorous speed intervals. Fartleks offer a runner the opportunity to experiment with various paces, ultimately increasing your speed and stamina.

Most worship leaders just ended another year of busyness that culminated in a flurry of seasonal rehearsals, presentations and extra services. And since ministry often sanctifies busyness instead of freeing us from it, we probably ended this hectic worship season by immediately starting another one. So some of us are undoubtedly wondering if we have enough left in the tank to do it all again. The question we need to ask as we begin 2017 is, “am I ready to run a healthy race that also includes margins of recovery between those seasons of going all-out?

Jesus said, “Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me – watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly” (Matt 11:28-30, The Message).

So if your 2016 worship leadership seemed joyless and you were constantly frustrated when those you led seemed to lag behind, then maybe it’s time to lighten up. Add some speed play to your rigorous schedule so you and those you lead can again experience the joy of worship leadership and have enough endurance to still be in the race at the end of 2017.

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Dec 27 2016

The Attention A Worship Leader Craves

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RelationshipsMost worship leaders hunger for the investment of and healthy communication with their senior pastor. But they don’t always have the freedom to initiate that relationship or those conversations until the senior pastor starts them. Consequently, planning, preparation and evaluation is often by trial and error that can be discouraging to the worship leader and frustrating to the senior pastor.

Worship leaders crave the attention of a senior pastor who values and creates a culture of healthy communication, sacrifice and trust that isn’t guarded, territorial, defensive or competitive. In other words, worship leaders long for the relational bond of shared ministry with a senior pastor who is confident enough in his own abilities and limitations to humbly admit publicly and privately that he can’t get it done alone.

The Pastor’s Attention A Worship Leader Craves

  • A collaborative spirit that is complementary, not competitive.
  • Grace that welcomes disagreement without fear of retaliation.
  • Approachability, availability and accountability.
  • Respect for the calling and leadership of others even when radically different from their own.
  • The capacity to affirm in public; correct and coach in private; and pastor in both places.
  • Enough humility to acknowledge that shared ministry doesn’t threaten but instead strengthens.
  • A desire to initiate significant conversations about vision, dreams, expectations and evaluations.
  • A yearning to invest in the personal and spiritual development of others with no ulterior motive.
  • Loyalty, trust and respect.
  • The confidence to acknowledge the sermon may not always be primary.
  • The resolve to work toward a common philosophy of worship.
  • A prayer intercessor for and with ministry colleagues.
  • Authentic transparency and vulnerability.
  • An appropriate sense of humor.
  • Full engagement in worship, spiritual disciplines and family.
  • True friendship.
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Dec 5 2016

20 Ways to Pray for Worship Leaders

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twenty

Ways to Pray for

Worship Leaders

 

 

  1. Pray that they never sacrifice their family for ministry since their family is ministry.
  2. Pray for them to prepare for Sunday by focusing on worship as primary and music as secondary.
  3. Pray that they will help us focus more on the creator and less on their creativity.
  4. Pray that Scripture and Prayer instead of song selections frame their worship preparation.
  5. Pray for healthier ministry staff relationships.
  6. Pray that their days off and vacations provide rest that is free from church responsibilities.
  7. Pray for their spiritual, physical and emotional health.
  8. Pray that they’ll be able to sift through the many responsibilities that compete for their attention and focus on the ones God wants them to do.
  9. Pray for them to wake up every morning feeling unqualified in their own power to do what God has called them to do.
  10. Pray Ephesians 4:29 over them, “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”
  11. Pray for them to daily recommit to their call here instead of dreaming about what it might be like to be there.
  12. Pray they never confuse leading music with leading people.
  13. Pray for them to have enough humility to engage us as participants instead of audiences.
  14. Pray for the protection of their marriages.
  15. Pray for trusted leaders to hold them accountable and protect them.
  16. Pray for their almost insurmountable task of trying to stay current musically, technologically and culturally.
  17. Pray for a great cloud of witnesses to surround them so they can fix their eyes on Jesus and run with endurance.
  18. Pray that they will have the courage to ignore the loudest voices if not God’s.
  19. Pray for their wisdom to select old and new songs that will help us respond to God’s revelation with biblical, theological and doctrinal integrity.
  20. Pray that they will have patience and persistence when it seems like none of us are completely happy with their musical selections.
  21.  

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Oct 3 2016

A Letter To My Younger Worship Leading Self

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letterDear Younger Worship Leading Me,

In a few decades you are going to look back at your years of worship ministry with a desire for a second chance to handle some things differently. You will think about certain services, special events, entire seasons of ministry or strained relationships and long for another opportunity to make some adjustments.

The reality is that it will be impossible for you to go back and make corrections to most of those situations. But with a little humility, resilience and resolve now, you have an opportunity to get some of them right the first time. So here are a few things you are going to learn.

Surround yourself with people who will stretch your thinking and actions but also hold you accountable. Taking necessary risks might cause you to make some mistakes but the discernment of others will help protect you from your own stupidity. It might be exhilarating when you succeed alone but it won’t be when you fail alone. And you will sometimes fail.

People will always remember how you treat them when you’re off the platform more than how you lead them on the platform so know more people’s names than new songs. Consider their interruptions as divine appointments instead of distractions. Drink more coffee with senior adults and ask their opinions before initiating change. Be more patient with needy people and chronic takers. And remember to thank those who make sacrifices to invest in you, your family and your ministry.

Be on the front end of learning newer musical and technological languages. But don’t assume it’s always appropriate to be an early adopter of them. Being conversant in a language doesn’t mean it should be used when it doesn’t fit the voice of your congregation. Learn more theology than musicology and practice leadership development more than you practice your guitar.

Always ask how something might impact your family before asking how it might impact your worship leading. Leave more things at the office when you go home and be home when you are home. Taking a Sabbath each week will not only help your spiritual and physical health, it will also help the relational health of your family. Stay longer instead of bailing for a new place of ministry every couple of years. If your ministry frequently moves your children away from their friends and foundations, then how can you expect them to even like church when they are no longer required to attend?

What you know about worship leading now won’t be enough to sustain you through your entire ministry. So read more, study more and ask more questions. Be a lifelong learner who understands it’s never too soon or too late to learn something new.

Finally, I know it is sometimes overwhelming to balance the stresses of ministry and family. So when leading worship is discouraging; when it seems like no generation is ever completely happy; when you can’t sing too many or too few hymns; and when you wake up on Monday morning and wonder if this is really worth it; you can rest assured that you’ll also be able to look back at those decades of ministry and acknowledge with certainty that it was.

Sincerely,

Your Older Worship Leading Self

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Sep 6 2016

Treating Worship Sickness Before A Diagnosis

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treatmentTrying to fix worship by randomly changing the songs is like a physician arbitrarily treating an illness before a diagnosis. Worship health and consequently its renewal will only occur by evaluating our worship principles first before we ever consider changing our worship practices.

Diagnosis is the process of determining by examination and evaluation the nature and circumstances of a diseased condition. Treatment is the administration and application of remedies once the diagnosis has been determined. We seem to continually invert these two processes.

So instead of evaluating our worship health based on biblical foundations, theological tenets and historical precedents, we often attempt to heal it through song selections, stylistic adjustments and personnel firings or hirings.

Intentional evaluation before indiscriminate implementation can provide a constructive process for a congregation to verbalize foundational worship principles. Once those deeper biblical and theological principles are solidified they can then set treatment goals for their worship practices in response to the actual diagnoses.

Trial and error treatment focused on style and service mechanics will continue to consume the energy of worship planners and leaders unless an organized diagnostic plan is put in place. The end result is often exacerbated worship unhealthiness that is much more contagious. But if instead we ensure that our diagnosis always precedes the treatment, our worship renewal prognosis can’t help but be more hopeful.

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Jun 27 2016

5 Questions Before Considering A Ministry Move

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Questions

If the choice to stay in your present ministry position or leave for another one is within your control, then you should be asking some fundamental questions before considering a move.

  • Has God released me from my call here?

Another place of ministry may seem more convenient, appealing, challenging, fulfilling and rewarding. But until God releases you to go there…stay here.

  • Am I running from something?

God didn’t promise that you’d always be happy, revered, loved, appreciated or followed. So if you are running from ministry or relational dysfunction that isn’t resolved here, what makes you think it wouldn’t follow you there?

  • Am I running to something?

If you are interested in another ministry just because it’s bigger, better, more prestigious or prominent, then your motivation might be ego instead of calling. If greener grass or several rungs up the ladder is the new you are running to, then you’ll inevitably be disappointed and so will they.

  • How might it impact my family?

Only considering your own ministry desires, needs and wants without recognizing how it might affect your family is not a calling, it is conceit. If your ministry frequently moves your children away from their friends and foundations, then how can you expect them to even like church when they are no longer required to attend?

  • Am I ready to leave well?

If you go out swinging when you leave here it will follow you when you get there. Leave with Ephesians 4:29 on your lips: “Do not let any unwholesome talk come out of your mouths, but only what is helpful for building others up according to their needs, that it may benefit those who listen.”

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Jun 1 2016

5 Reasons Worship Leaders Are Losing Their Jobs

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reasonsChristianity Today recently published an article indicating that nearly one-fourth of all active ministers have been forced out at some point in their ministry. It is true that staying in a current ministry position may not always be within our control. But what if we are or aren’t doing some things that are contributing to our positional demise? Aren’t we called to do everything we can here instead of just hoping it will be different when we move there?

Relational instead of musical deficiencies seem to be at the root of many forced worship leader terminations. And yet, most worship leaders continue to spend the majority of their time just trying to get better musically. We’ll never be able to learn and teach enough new songs to make up for relationship and leadership failures.

5 Reasons Worship Leaders Are Losing Their Jobs

They equate leading music with leading people

Meaningful relationships develop as we place more focus on people than projects. What will our congregants remember most…how we led them musically on the platform or how we treated them to and from the platform?

 

They aren’t learning anything new

Ageism often gets the blame for this one. Even though ministry ageism is theologically suspect so is not learning anything new. A lifelong learner is one who understands it is never too soon or too late to learn. What we once learned is not enough to sustain our entire ministry.

 

They’ve confused calling and convenience

What is compelling us? Convenience responds with, “This is what I like to do.” Calling responds with, “This is what I was created to do.” If we lead worship just because we love to play and sing, because we need to supplement our income, because we enjoy being up-front or because we aren’t trained to do anything else, then our compulsion might be out of convenience instead of calling.

 

They can’t get along with their pastor

Even when we win a relationship conflict with our pastor, we lose. The relationships exemplified by the Acts 2 church as they spent time together, had everything in common, broke bread in their homes and ate together with glad and sincere hearts is often foreign to pastors and worship leaders. What could occur relationally if we resolved to buy-in to our pastor’s leadership as long as it wasn’t immoral, illegal or unethical?

 

Their family isn’t their ministry

Scripture reminds us to love God first, then our neighbors as ourselves. Our closest neighbor is our family. We must never sacrifice family for ministry since they are our ministry. Instead, we should first ask how something might impact our family before ever asking how it might impact our job.

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Mar 22 2016

Building A Wall And Asking Senior Adults To Pay For It

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wallSenior adults are probably not as averse to church change as much as they are to feeling marginalized through those changes. Their opinions are no longer needed or considered and their convictions seem to be overlooked as antiquated. I can imagine some seniors view change as building a wall to separate what was from what will be.

It appears that the price paid through their years of blood, sweat, tears and tithes is now being used to build a wall that will sideline or keep them out completely. When your horse dies…stop riding it may be a great adage to challenge congregations attempting to reach an ever-changing culture with never changing practices. But it doesn’t offer much comfort for the pain and grief of those who loved the horse.

Change is sometimes necessary when a church considers the culture and context of those present and those not present yet. But in an effort to initiate change, some congregations push to do anything different than what was done in the past.

Congregations often change their worship and discipleship styles and structures without ever evaluating their existing people and practices. That lack of planning and reflection can often cause unnecessary transitional pain as a result of the depreciation of what was.

Since change is often essential in order for churches to progress, the automatic assumption is it will always require incorporating something completely new. It is possible, however, that the only new necessary for congregational health and growth is to do what you are already doing…better.

Chip and Dan Heath wrote, “We rarely ask the question: What’s working and how can we do more of it? What we ask instead is more problem-focused: What’s broken and how do we fix it?[1] Maybe the change most of our congregations actually need is not a revolution but instead a reevaluation.

A revolution forcibly overthrows an existing system or structure in order to substitute another. It replaces what presently exists without considering what might still hold value. And in a revolution one side always loses.

A reevaluation, however, considers or examines something again. Reevaluation allows a congregation to consider change by rethinking, revisiting and reinvestigating. It systematically and selectively preserves valuable elements for re-use.

Most of us like to blow things up, so our initial response when things don’t seem to be working is to completely destroy existing practices for the prospect of future success. Maybe a reevaluation instead of a revolution would allow us to tear down those walls between our generations. And maybe church change conversations should begin with how we can prayerfully add to rather than arbitrarily take away.

“Any change can be approached as either a threat or an opportunity, either a cause for celebration or a reason to despair.” Craig Satterlee

 

[1] Heath, Chip and Dan Heath, Switch:  How to Change Things When Change Is Hard (New York: Broadway Books, 2010), 55.

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Feb 8 2016

Getting Older: The Worship Leader’s Third Rail

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third railAgeism has impacted or probably will at some point impact most of us serving in worship leadership. Churches seem to be on the lookout for a younger platform presence or fresher image from those who lead.

Forced termination or demotion as a result of the ageism epidemic reminds us that where we serve is not always ours to control. What we can control, however, is that we are prepared to continue to serve even if it is no longer here.

So what if we find ourselves only prepared to lead a ministry that no longer exists? What if what we once learned is not enough to sustain us through our entire ministry? What can we do that will allow us to continue?

Learn Something New – The end of learning new is the beginning of leading old. A lifelong learner is one who understands it is never too soon or too late to learn something new. Famed basketball coach John Wooden stated, “It’s what you learn after you know it all that counts.” So if you haven’t yet learned the language of capos and cajons, it’s not too late. Eric Hoffer wrote, “It is the learners who inherit the future. The learned usually find themselves equipped to live in a world that no longer exists.”

Extend Your Shelf Life – Shelf Life is the length of time items are given before they are considered unsuitable for use or consumption. It is the time in which the defined quality remains fresh, acceptable, viable, usable and effective under normal or expected circumstances. Increasing our shelf life encourages us to recalibrate or fine tune for the potential of a new reality. It necessitates a rededication or recommitment to our base call to ministry instead of focusing solely on our present position. And it often calls for a reboot or restart that will reawaken our drive.

Get A Real Job – What if you were asked to step aside from worship ministry and opportunities were no longer available for you to lead worship full or even part time? Some of us have found ourselves in a similar situation only to realize we aren’t trained or training to do anything else. Getting a real job means we are prepared vocationally to take care of our family and financial needs even if we need to step aside from leading worship. Learning additional marketable skills either inside our outside the church doesn’t compromise our calling. In fact, retooling can enhance that calling by expanding our influence beyond choirs and chord charts.

Agreeing that worship ministry ageism is unjust or theologically suspect doesn’t change its reality. So we can choose to live in a constant state of lament or we can proactively prepare in case it does occur. Like the third rail, how we approach ageism has the power to propel or terminate our future ministry.

Death is inevitable but decomposition before then is optional

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Jan 25 2016

Playing Hurt: Leading Worship Through Pain

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playing hurtSuck it up. Shake it off. Take one for the team. These are adages we often hear from sports coaches and fans. Publicly acknowledging an injury can sideline a player and even threaten his/her future with the team. So players continue to play through their pain with the reality that it’s often easier for a team to replace than rehabilitate them. This same pattern of expendability is also evident in church culture. To save face, favor and financial security, worship pastors often sense a profound pressure to perform even when they might not feel like it. To secure their position, they often play hurt.

Most church members don’t realize the physical, emotional, mental and spiritual demands required to serve as a worship pastor. They may be aware of the investment their worship pastor has made in their own lives. What they don’t often calculate, however, is the cumulative time and energy those investments require when multiplied by the entire population of their congregation.

Worship pastors often serve as personal counselors, mentors, leaders, friends and spiritual advisors. They are usually the first ones called to musically and technologically marry children or bury parents. When the families of worship ministry participants are in crisis, the worship pastor is often expected to referee, repair and reclaim.

Additionally, serving as a worship pastor doesn’t necessarily mean you are immune from the personal struggles of life such as depression and anxiety, physical health issues, marital conflict, rebellious children and financial strain. With all of these personal and professional stressors, how can we not expect pain to eventually take its toll?

Church culture doesn’t often put safeguards in place to protect ministers from ministry. So if you are beginning to feel a slight twinge you might want to consider putting your own guardrails in place before the pain becomes chronic. The following questions might offer a place to begin:

  • How often do I engage in personal prayer or Bible study not related to the role or function of ministry?
  • Have I ever considered a sabbatical, ministry hiatus or leave of absence?
  • How often do I participate in worship when I am not the leader?
  • Do I listen to music for personal inspiration in addition to professional preparation?
  • Have I enlisted a confidential friend, mentor, coach or counselor with whom I meet regularly for processing and prayer?
  • Do I participate in an accountability group other than my church staff or personnel team?
  • How many days off do I take each week?
  • Do I take all of my vacation? Do I take church-related phone calls and respond to texts and emails while I’m on vacation?
  • How much time is reserved for home life? (Four nights a week? Two nights? Saturdays? Rarely?)
  • For married worship pastors: How often do I have a “date night” with my spouse?
  • For single worship pastors:Do I spend time with friends or family members on a regular basis?
  • Do I have friends who are not members of my congregation? Do conversations always circle back to my church activities?
  • Do I have an annual physical?
  • How often do I engage in physical exercise lasting at least 30 minutes? Am I heavier than my recommended weight?
  • How balanced is my diet?
  • Do I have interests or hobbies outside the church? Do I set them aside when I get too busy?
  • What would I willing to change or do to stay in ministry for the long haul?[1]

In his book Leading on Empty, Wayne Cordeiro used surfing to illustrate how ministry longevity is possible. He wrote, “Veteran surfers possess an uncanny sense of the ocean’s currents and how waves behave. Their intuition tells them which ones to catch and which ones to let pass. They seem to discern which waves will carry them in and which waves will do them in! But one of the true marks of a veteran is not how he catches a wave, but whether he knows when and how to get off the wave.”[2]

 

[1] Some of these questions were edited and adapted from Jill M. Hudson, When Better Isn’t Enough: Evaluation Tools for the 21st Century Church (Herndon: The Alban Institute, 2004), 42-43.

[2] Wayne Cordeiro, Leading on Empty: Refilling Your Tank and Renewing Your Passion (Minneapolis: Bethany House, 2009), 28.

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Jan 11 2016

Pastor, Could You Work For You?

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Pastor, Could You Work For You If…

  • opinions different from yours were seen as disloyalty?
  • collaboration meant everyone just listened to and implemented your ideas?
  • shared ministry threatened your control?
  • your ministry initiatives were always the non-negotiable ones?
  • you never owned any deficiencies contributing to staff relationship issues?
  • your leadership default was autocracy instead of advocacy?
  • you were a gatekeeper instead of a liberator?
  • you had outgrown the need to learn anything new?
  • other ministries were seen as competition instead of complementary?
  • all other ministries were evaluated except for yours?
  • friendship with other staff members was not an option?
  • you considered yourself as the only one qualified to lead?
  • you wouldn’t work with others because they work for you?
  • your expectations were assumed but never clarified until they were unmet?

angry bossLeading a ministry culture of healthy communication and collaboration requires a level of sacrifice and trust that cannot be guarded, territorial, defensive or competitive. It publicly and privately acknowledges the calling and competence of others and is not afraid of transparent dialogue. And it openly embraces and shares unified goals and the responsibilities for fulfilling them.

Pastor, don’t you realize what you are missing by disregarding intentional, significant conversations about vision, hopes, dreams and goals? Aren’t you longing for staff relationships built on trust, loyalty, respect and friendship? Wouldn’t you love to pray and plan together with ministry teams as partners instead of puppets?

How fulfilling could it be to minister in a place that constantly conveys an attitude of mutual spiritual and relational development with no ulterior motive? It is never too late to realize that the final word doesn’t always have to be yours. When that occurs your ministry relationships and your church will never be the same.

For we are co-workers in God’s service (1 Cor. 3:9)

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Dec 14 2015

50 Worship Leading Tips Rookies Should Learn and Veterans Should Relearn

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fifty tips

  • Learn more people’s names than new songs.
  • Take a Sabbath every week.
  • Make deposits in younger leaders and withdrawals from older leaders.
  • Pray for and defend your pastor even when he doesn’t deserve it.
  • Leave more things at the office when you go home.
  • Ask how it might impact your family before asking how it might impact your job.
  • Learn more theology than musicology.
  • Welcome divine interruptions in your routine.
  • Surround yourself with those to protect you from your own stupidity.
  • Place more focus on people than projects.
  • Stay longer.
  • Celebrate the Lord’s Supper more often.
  • Begin all worship planning with Scripture and Prayer instead of songs titles.
  • Drink more coffee with senior adults and students.
  • The original song key may not be the best key for congregational singing.
  • Practice leadership as much as you practice your guitar.
  • Cast vision for the future without denigrating the past.
  • Not all thoughts that enter your mind have to exit your mouth.
  • Don’t feel threatened when someone else gets the credit.
  • Affirm volunteers in public, correct them in private and pastor them in both places.
  • Don’t randomly blow things up without considering where the pieces might land.
  • Help grandparents and grandchildren worship together.
  • If you don’t guard yourself spiritually, emotionally and physically no one else will.
  • Public worship will never succeed without private worship.
  • Understand the difference between knowing you can and deciding you should.
  • Never stop being a student.
  • Always err on the side of grace.
  • Build bridges from the platform to the pews.
  • Turn house lights up and volume down occasionally to see if they are even singing.
  • Don’t determine the worship language of your congregation based on how you might appear to other worship leaders.
  • You’ll always sing too many or too few hymns or modern worship songs for someone.
  • Filter songs theologically before musically.
  • Wake up every morning feeling unqualified in your own power to do what God has called you to do.
  • Keep your focus on where you are instead of where you wish you were.
  • Spend as much time on relationships as you spend on ministry job placement sites.
  • Not all staff problems originate in someone else’s office.
  • There are lots of other churches but you only have one family.
  • Your attitude may be the only change necessary.
  • Scripted, explainable and rational aren’t always worship prerequisites.
  • If you try to succeed alone you’ll also fail alone.
  • Setting boundaries ahead of time gives you the resolve to say no.
  • What you once learned is not enough to sustain your entire ministry.
  • The worship service you prepared may not be the most important worship that occurs this week.
  • Just changing the music won’t grow or kill your church.
  • Not every worship song is appropriate for congregational singing.
  • Leading music doesn’t necessarily mean you are leading people.
  • Worship even when you aren’t the leader.
  • Your musical talent may help you secure a position but leadership and relationships will help you keep it.
  • Don’t lead worship just because you don’t know how to do anything else.
  • If you’re saving your best for where God might call you next, why would He want to?
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Oct 5 2015

Worship Pastor Prayer: Give Me Jesus!

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give me jesusWorship pastors live under a tremendous pressure to perform. The demands and stresses of the position can lead to relational conflict, burnout, family crisis and even forced termination. At one time or another we have all asked if worship ministry is really worth it or if we should consider doing something…anything else.

To combat inevitable ministry stressors, our evening prayer should be that of the old spiritual, In the morning when I rise, Give me Jesus. Our laments may resonate with some of those listed below but our response must always be the same…Give Me Jesus.

  • When I’m working too much according to my family and not enough according to my pastor…Give Me Jesus.
  • When we can’t sing too few or too many hymns or modern songs…Give Me Jesus.
  • When I wonder if my children will even like church when they are no longer required to attend…Give Me Jesus.
  • When no generation is really happy musically…Give Me Jesus.
  • When my worship leading shelf life is speeding toward its expiration date…Give Me Jesus.
  • When I seem to always be a step behind musically, technologically and culturally…Give Me Jesus.
  • When congregants target my family because they are upset with me…Give Me Jesus.
  • When I’m tempted to quit every Monday morning…Give Me Jesus.
  • When pastor/staff collaboration actually means command and control compliance…Give Me Jesus.
  • When it seems like I no longer have a great cloud of witness surrounding me…Give Me Jesus.
  • When I don’t have the resolve to take care of myself spiritually, emotionally or physically…Give Me Jesus.
  • When I’m always the first one to arrive and last one to leave…Give Me Jesus.
  • When burnout is causing me to coast…Give Me Jesus.
  • When the music I lead is accountable for church growth or culpable for church decline…Give Me Jesus.

You can have all this world, but give me Jesus!

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Sep 14 2015

Worship Leaders Need To Give It A Rest!

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restIf you don’t take a Sabbath, something is wrong. You’re doing too much, you’re being too much in charge. You’ve got to quit, one day a week, and just watch what God is doing when you’re not doing anything.                  Eugene H. Peterson                      

If you’ve flown on a commercial airline you have undoubtedly heard the flight attendant recite the following pre-flight safety instructions: “In the unlikely event the oxygen level in the main cabin becomes unstable, oxygen masks will drop in front of each passenger.” Passengers are then instructed to secure their own masks before assisting other passengers.

Sunday is the day designated each week by most congregations as the Sabbath or day of rest. As a worship leader, your Sabbath has evolved into a day full of services, rehearsals and meetings. At the end of the day your spiritual, emotional, mental and physical resources are usually completely depleted.

Someone once said that Sunday for those in ministry is like giving birth only to realize on Monday morning that you are pregnant again. So since Sunday is obviously not a Sabbath for you, when are you taking one? Maybe the more telling question is are you taking one? If not, how can you expect to lead people to a place you no longer have the stamina to go yourself?

Observing a day of rest “says to the frantic, exhausted, distracted, fatigued people of God: please, rest. The hectic lives of Christians in our culture and the busyness of many churches show little sign of living out of God’s rest. Our tendencies to imitate our culture are directly related to our unwillingness to stop, cease producing, consuming, moving, accomplishing, buying, planning. We can be as much 24-7 (even in the name of Jesus) as our secular neighbors. Yet we cannot live as light and salt, doing righteousness and showing justice, if we fail to practice living out God’s rest. It’s a boundary that sets us free.”[1]

Worship Ministry has the tendency to sanctify busyness rather than free us from it. We have developed worship leading cultures that value motion as a sign of significance. We lead those cultures as if our efforts are essential to God’s success in His mission to the world.

But Jesus said, “Are you tired? Worn out? Burned out on religion? Come to me. Get away with me and you’ll recover your life. I’ll show you how to take a real rest. Walk with me and work with me – watch how I do it. Learn the unforced rhythms of grace. I won’t lay anything heavy or ill-fitting on you. Keep company with me and you’ll learn to live freely and lightly” (Matt 11:28-30, The Message).

Several years ago, David Henderson wrote an article titled Take A Load Off: Are You Doing More than God Intended? Based on the previous Matthew passage, Henderson suggested that we could lighten our load by stripping off our self-made yokes, by laying aside the things God has not called us to and by asking God to lead us into each day.

Observing a Sabbath is saying yes to God and his rhythms and no to the life-draining rhythms of the culture and people around us – it is essential to our call to worship.[2] So if we as leaders aren’t modeling Sabbath rest for our congregations, who is?

[1] Mark Labberton, The Dangerous Act of Worship: Living God’s Call to Justice (Downers Grove: InterVarsity, 2007), 96.

[2] Ibid.

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Jul 13 2015

Healthy Worshipers Bunt

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buntIn his search for the roots of violence, Mahatma Gandhi drafted a list to give to his grandson titled the “Seven Blunders of the World.” Number seven was Worship without Sacrifice.

Paul focused on the divisions that segregate us. In the twelfth chapter of Romans he wrote, “Therefore, I urge you, brothers, in view of God’s mercy, to offer your bodies as living sacrifices, holy and pleasing to God – which is your spiritual worship.”

Paul used this image of the body to represent the whole person, including ideologies and preferences. Living sacrifice signifies an ongoing, constant, all-inclusive submission. To sacrifice is to surrender for the sake of something or someone else. It is the act of giving up, offering up or letting go. The antonym of sacrifice is to hold on to.

A bunt in baseball is designated as a sacrifice for the purpose of advancing another runner. Executing this sacrifice is called laying down a bunt. What a challenging word picture for the church as it gathers together in communal worship.

Worship Bunters…

  • Lay down their preferences because they love those with whom they worship more than they love those preferences.
  • Acknowledge that worship did not begin and will not end with the worship preferences of their generation.
  • Admit it is arrogant to assume their favorite worship and God’s favorite worship are the same.

Charles Thomas Studd, an English missionary who served in China, India, and Africa had this statement as his motto:  “If Jesus Christ is God and died for me, then no sacrifice can be too great for me to make for him.”

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